Monday, April 29, 2013

Grape Seed Extract May be a Viable Treatment Option for Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer cases continue to grow among men and women in the US, largely fueled by a diet of processed convenience foods and a sedentary lifestyle void of regular exercise. Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, with more than 100,000 new diagnoses and 52,000 deaths attributed to the disease each year. Natural compounds including curcumin and resveratrol have proven effective in the prevention of colon cancer, and now scientists have determined that grape seed extract (GSE) specifically targets damaged cells in the digestive tract to provide an effective treatment for colorectal cancer.

Grape Seed Extract Promotes Programmed Cancer Cell Death to Prevent Colon Cancer Progression
A research team from the University of Colorado Cancer Center have published the results of a study in the journal, Cancer Letters demonstrating that the more advanced colorectal cancer cells are, the more GSE inhibits their growth and survival. Conversely, GSE does not affect healthy cells and is shown to specifically target only cancerous cells. The authors note that this is an important finding in light of the increased number of late stage colon cancer cases currently being diagnosed.

Lead study author and doctoral candidate Molly Derry commented We've known for quite a while that the bioactive compounds in grape seed extract selectively target many types of cancer cells. This study shows that many of the same mutations that allow colorectal cancer cells to metastasize and survive traditional therapies make them especially sensitive to treatment with GSE.” This research could provide a critical starting point to encourage the use of natural therapies to treat colon cancer, rather than the traditional slash, burn and poison methods that cause more harm than good for many who suffer from the disease.

Supplement with Grape Seed Extract to Reduce Cellular Oxidation Associated with Cancer Proliferation
Scientists studied the effect of GSE on various stages of colon cancer cell lines, ranging from Stage 1 to Stage IV. They found that similar concentrations of GSE exerted a more profound effect in eradicating more advanced stages of colon cancer, indicating that the natural compound may provide an effective treatment option for more advanced forms of the disease. The Ms. Derry noted “It required less than half the concentration of GSE to suppress cell growth and kill 50 percent of stage IV cells than it did to achieve similar results in the stage II cells.”

The study team discovered that GSE targets colorectal cancer through inducing oxidative stress that leads to the programmed cell death known as apoptosis. Ms. Derry concluded “the many bioactive compounds of GSE are able to target multiple mutations. The more mutations a cancer presents, the more effective GSE is in targeting them.” Nutrition experts recommend supplementing with a standardized whole grape seed extract (150 to 250 mg) daily to provide a protective shield against colon and digestive cancers.

Monday, April 22, 2013

Resveratrol Protects against Blood Sugar Surges to Prevent Diabetes and Improve Cardiovascular Health

Allopathic practitioners and the pharmaceutical giants enjoy promoting natural compounds including resveratrol as worthless, akin to snake oil and frequently attempt to convince the public that they are wasting their money by using these supplements. Naturally, the big medical concerns make huge profits by selling a host of prescription drugs that account for more than 100,000 deaths every year, even when taken as prescribed. Not a single death has been recorded from using resveratrol, yet the health benefits are profoundly significant and repeatedly documented in peer reviewed scientific studies.

Scientists Detail how Resveratrol Prevents Damage from High Blood Glucose to Maintain Vascular Function
Researchers from China have published the results of a study in the journal, Genes and Nutrition, showing how resveratrol protects against common damage to the arteries that leads to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular dysfunction. While the scientists specifically detailed how the natural compound helps prevent complications in diabetics where fasting and post meal blood glucose can surge from three to five times normal, many health-conscious individuals can benefit from this information to protect them from arterial deterioration frequently associated with cardiovascular disease and increased heart attack risk.

Our arteries are lined with a delicate, single cell layer of tissue called the endothelium that is essential to maintain proper blood pressure and volume, and acts as a barrier to protect against metabolic byproducts floating in circulation. The endothelium is very sensitive to excess levels of glucose in the bloodstream and can become damaged and tear when sugar crystals remain in circulation for extended periods, such as occurs after a meal high in sugars and refined carbohydrates. When the endothelium is breached, micro cracks occur that accumulate foamy plaque leading to future coronary artery disease.

Supplement Daily with Resveratrol to Preserve Vascular Health and Halt AGE Formation
Scientists found that blood sugar surges caused the endothelium to become permeable, allowing oxidized LDL cholesterol, calcium and other circulating materials to become lodged inside the arterial wall. The study team determined that resveratrol stopped endothelial leaking and helped maintain proper vascular structure even under stressful conditions experienced with high blood sugar levels. Further, the researchers detailed the precise mechanism exerted by the compound to maintain the structural integrity of the arterial wall.

The team concluded that resveratrol helped prevent the most common type of arterial damage caused by poor diet and advanced aging. Advanced glycation end products (AGE’s) are formed when blood sugars and protein become bound to form useless structures that can adhere to and damage our arteries. Resveratrol (nutritionists recommend 400 mg of a standardized formulation per day) was shown to halt this damage and provides a critical nutritional intervention to prevent complications and maintain cardiovascular health in both diabetics and healthy individuals.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Strawberry and Blueberry Flavonoids Cut Heart Attack Risk in Women by One-Third

Thousands of research studies over the past decade have heralded the critical importance of eating a diet filled with flavonoids from a variety of brightly colored vegetables and fruits to help prevent and even treat many chronic illnesses. Most plants and fruits rely on flavonoid compounds for protection against the environment and to propagate and flourish. These same properties support human health by altering genetic expression and specifically targeting essential metabolic processes to ward off diseases such as cancer, dementia and the most prevalent killer of men and women, cardiovascular disease.

Anthocyanins from Eating Berries Dramatically Lowers Heart Attack Risk in a Large Sampling of Women
Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health developed a study to analyze a specific sub-class of flavonoids, called anthocyanins, that has been shown to help dilate arteries, counter the buildup of plaque and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Publishing in the journal Circulation, the scientists found that women who ate at least three servings of blueberries and strawberries per week had significantly fewer heart attacks. Blueberries and strawberries contain high levels of anthocyanins that have shown cardiovascular benefits in past research studies.

Lead study author, Dr. Eric Rimm noted “Blueberries and strawberries can easily be incorporated into what women eat every week… this simple dietary change could have a significant impact on prevention efforts." The researchers developed a cohort of 93,600 women nurses, aged between 25 and 42 who completed dietary questionnaires every four years for a period of 18 years.

Eat Three to Five Servings of Fresh Mixed Berries Each Week to Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk
Over the course of the study review period, 405 women experienced a heart attack. The study team found that women who consumed the most blueberries and strawberries had a 32-percent reduction in their risk of heart attack as compared to women who ate the berries once a month or less. Interestingly, the results did not change in women who otherwise ate a diet rich in other fruits and vegetables, providing solid proof that the flavonoids provided by the berries were responsible for the heart attack risk reduction benefits.

The study authors concluded “We have shown that even at an early age, eating more of these fruits may reduce risk of a heart attack later in life.” The study results were independent of other risk factors, such as age, high blood pressure, family history of heart attack, body mass, exercise, smoking, caffeine or alcohol intake. While this study was conducting using a large sampling of women, eating between 3 and 5 servings of fresh berries each week can dramatically lower heart attack risk for men and women alike.

Monday, April 8, 2013

Brisk Walking Slashes Stroke Risk in Women by Fifty Percent

Physical inactivity continues to be a significant underlying cause of chronic illness and early death in the US, as sedentary Americans succumb to the utilitarian comforts of modern technology. Lack of exercise, coupled with a largely processed food diet leads to potentially deadly diseases including cancer, dementia, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Stroke incidence continues to increase at a staggering rate, affecting 425,000 women each year, often leaving them unable to perform routine daily tasks and increasing mortality risk.

A Brisk Walk Improves Vascular Function in Women to Help Prevent Stroke
Researchers from Spain have published the result of a study in the journal Stroke that has determined walking at least three hours a week reduces the risk of stroke among women by nearly half, yet another important reminder of the health benefits of exercising on a consistent basis. The study team set out to assess the association between regular physical activity and cerebrovascular diseases, defined as conditions that develop as a result of problems with the blood vessels inside the brain such as stroke.

To conduct the study, scientists developed a cohort consisting of 13,576 men and 19,416 women, aged 29 to 69 years who were part of the European Cancer Project that was initiated during the mid-1990’s. Participants responded to a physical activity questionnaire and were divided by gender, type of physical activity and how much time they had spent on physical activity.

Talk a Brisk Walk Five Days a Week to Limit Risk from a Devastating Stroke
After a 12 year follow-up period, 442 stroke cases were recorded and subsequently classified as 80 percent ischemic, 10 percent hemorrhagic, 7 percent subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 3 percent unspecified. Interestingly, the researchers determined that physical activity was associated with a stroke reduction risk for women but not men. Women who walked at least 210 minutes (3 ½ hours) a week showed a reduced risk for stroke of 43 percent compared to those who did not participate in physical activity.

The team also revealed that other types of exercise, regardless of intensity had no significant association in stroke risk reduction. The study authors concluded “Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke.” Walking briskly for 30 minutes on most days of the week is not only a perfect complement to weight management strategies, but also dramatically lowers the risk of a devastating stroke in women.

Monday, April 1, 2013

Resveratrol May Help to Prevent and Even Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Incidence of Alzheimer’s disease cases continue to explode at an unprecedented rate as processed food diets, overweight and obesity become the norm for middle and senior aged adults in the US and most western societies. By the year 2050, it’s projected that 13.2 million adults will suffer from this degenerative disease that ranks as the sixth leading cause of death, with many suffering early signs of the condition at earlier ages. Any natural compound that can be shown to prevent or even treat Alzheimer’s disease would be a potent therapeutic tool.

Resveratrol Confirm the Benefits of Resveratrol to Fight Alzheimer’s Disease
Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center's Memory Disorders Program have embarked on a mission to demonstrate that resveratrol can affect memory deterioration and daily functioning in people with mild to moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease. Resveratrol is a natural compound found in red grapes, red grape juice, red wine, chocolate, tomatoes and peanuts. In prior studies, the polyphenol has been shown to help prevent diabetes, act as a natural cancer fighter, ward off cardiovascular disease, and prevent memory loss.

As the risk of many chronic conditions increase with aging, resveratrol exhibits unique characteristics as it has been shown to impede telomere shortening and extend natural cell life and activity. Resveratrol has also been shown to improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, two mechanisms known to speed the aging process.

Supplement with Resveratrol Daily to Lower the Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s Dementia
Researchers will examine the direct impact of pure resveratrol supplementation on neural aging and amyloid protein clearance. Recent research has suggested that Alzheimer’s disease may result from insulin resistance specifically in the brain, and as resveratrol is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, the compound may prevent faulty insulin signaling that promotes the degenerative condition.

This is the largest and most extensive study of its kind developed to validate the brain health benefits of resveratrol. Researchers will recruit participants from 26 U.S. academic institutions that are affiliated with the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study around the country. This study is unique because it is designed to demonstrate the impact of a natural compound and not a patentable pharmaceutical drug.

Resveratrol is supplied in small amounts from dietary sources including red grapes, red wine, chocolate and tomatoes. Nutrition experts recommend supplementing with a pure extract (20 to 500 mg per day) for optimal protection against Alzheimer’s disease and a myriad of chronic conditions.